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만우절: “April Fool’s Day” in SK

1Have you received or pulled a prank today? April 1st is April Fool’s Day, 만우절 in Korean. My husband woke up very early this morning, and I thought that he was planning to play a trick on me, but he was just watching the news. Perhaps, he got tired of playing tricks, because we have been pranking each other every 만우절 since we got married. I was tempted to turn off the water heater while he was taking a shower, but I remembered he has a cold. He’s taking a nap right now and I’m thinking of drawing a mustache on his face. A friend is coming later. When she sees him, I bet the reaction will be gut-busting! =)

I am reposting an article I wrote about April Fool’s Day in Korea. Enjoy reading and good luck on the pranks! ^^

 

From Korea with Love

Back in the Philippines, I didn’t know about April Fool’s Day. It isn’t as popular in my country as it is in South Korea. April Fool’s Day (also known as All Fool’s Day), which is celebrated on April 1st, is believed to have begun in France, but nowadays, people from all over the world follow the tradition of playing practical jokes on one another.

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Last year, my husband played a trick on me. It made me upset, but before I could strangle him, he told me he was just kidding, because it was 만우절 (April Fool’s Day in Korean). 만 (man) means “many” or “much”, and 우 means “foolish”. Put the words together and the real meaning will be “very foolish”.

Today was my turn to pull Mr. Ra’s (my husband’s) leg… and I succeeded! ㅋㅋㅋ … ^^

Here’s my prank which I sent throughKakaotalk:

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고맙습니다, 선생님! (Thank you, Teacher!) ^^

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May 15th is Teacher’s Day in South Korea. On this special day, students give their teachers carnations or thank-you letters. Some prefer to give cosmetics or chocolates.

394375_644082432273104_927772010_nMy Korean students usually write me letters or give candies and chocolates on Teacher’s Day.

Last year, when I returned to work after taking a short leave, my youngest class surprised me with a note on the board and gave me a group hug. The little ones could not prepare any flowers or presents, but they gave me the best gift that day.

This morning, the first one to greet me “Happy teacher’s day” was my husband. (Well, he used to be my student. ^^)

Tomorrow. it’s my turn to make a teacher smile. I’m sure that my Korean language teacher will receive carnations from other students, so instead of flowers, I’m thinking of buying her Starbucks coffee or maybe getting her a Starbucks gift card. You can purchase a Teacher’s Day gift card in Starbucks or order one on-line or via smart phone. The video below will give you instructions on how to do it. (It’s in Korean though.)

I’ve worked with many Korean teachers. They are very patient and hardworking.

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My first Korean language teacher is a nurse, but she volunteered to teach foreign wives and migrant workers in Namyangju (South Korea). Now she heads a multi-cultural center in Donong. She has been very helpful to me, especially when I was still adjusting to the Korean way of life. At times, she took me and my classmates on field trips. When my husband was busy with work and he didn’t have time to assist me with some documents I needed in the hagwon, it was my Korean teacher who helped me. She doesn’t teach me anymore, but I visit her in the center sometimes.

I’m planning to see her this week to tell her personally, 고맙습니다, 선생님! (gomapseumnida , ​​seonsaengnim) (Thank you, Teacher!)

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If you have a Korean teacher you would like to greet on Teacher’s day, you can say, “스승의 날 축하해요!” ( seuseung-ui nal chughahaeyo) which means…

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